Symphony: Fall 2017

Read the fall issue of Symphony on your laptop, your desktop, your phone, your tablet for free!

Check out the latest issue of Symphony, the League of American Orchestras' award-winning magazine, online—with all the great articles, news, interviews, and photos you’ve come to expect.

Full Magazine

fall2017

Click here for a PDF of the complete fall issue of Symphony. You can easily read the whole issue online via Issuu. This version includes links to websites in the articles as well as to advertisers.

 

 

 

 


Individual Articles, Features, and More

Click below to read, print, or download sharable PDFs of the articles from this issue, with links to websites in the articles as well as to advertisers.

score

Score

Symphony’s fast-paced Score section, filled with news and updates from across the orchestra field. Plus: updates on how orchestras responded to hurricanes Harvey and Irma.

 

 

board

Board Members as Advocates

A key part of board members’ responsibility is ensuring that the organizations they represent have a place at the table with elected officials. BoardSource President and CEO Anne Wallestad offers insights and strategies. Plus: the League’s Playing Your Part: An Orchestra’s Guide to Pubic Policy Advocacy.

 

Seen and Heard: Conference 2017conference

The League’s 2017 Conference brought together a rich array of views about the present—and future—of orchestras. Excerpts from three vital sessions focusing on classical musicians of African descent, digital marketing, and building audiences.

 

edceEdCE on the Rise

Key takeaways from the League’s new report, Of and For the Community: The Education and Community Engagement Work of Orchestras.



 

pipeline

Pipeline to Inclusion

More and more orchestras are launching fellowships to increase musician diversity. What are these programs like for the participants? Five musicians in one such program share their perspectives.

 

bern

The Legacy of Leonard Bernstein

As Leonard Bernstein’s 100th birthday in 2018 approaches, and orchestras everywhere perform his scores, conductor Leon Botstein shares his personal view of the legacy of the man who was—and still is—America’s best-known classical musician. 



east

East Meets West Meets East

U.S. orchestras of every description are flocking to China, the number of Chinese orchestras is growing, and works by Chinese composers are being played by orchestras in both countries. Jennifer Melick reports on the evolving scene during a visit to the Shanghai Orchestra Academy with the New York Philharmonic.

 

star

Star Search

They galvanize audiences, connect with classical musicians, and give pops concerts that extra jolt. Six stellar soloists and one conductor tell the inside story of the headliners who take center stage at pops concerts with orchestras. By Steven Brown




pops

Symphony Pops Listings 2017

The tops in pops attractions for orchestras, in a special advertising section.




 

100100 Years Young

Heading into its centennial season, the Cleveland Orchestra could have rested on its considerable artistic laurels. Instead, it is looking forward: patrons 25 years old and younger now make up 20 percent of its audience for classical concerts. Mike Telin investigates how they did it.



coda

From the Archives: The League at 75

As the League celebrates its 75th anniversary, we share a sampling of outstanding moments in its history. Here, correspondence from composers Aaron Copland and Lou Harrison, conductor Leopold Stokowski, and cartoonist Charles Schultz with long-term League executive Helen M. Thompson reveals their distinctive personal styles. 

 

Happy reading! Look for the winter 2018 issue in January.

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